Magical Mumbai

Mumbai is the west coast’s most populated city. The largest city in India, Mumbai is India’s heart. It is also the center of the nation’s film industry, Bollywood. Full of rising skyscrapers and historical landmarks at the same time, Mumbai is a magical city. The city is glitzy, glamorous, and unabashedly fancy. If you’re planning to visit the city, here are some places you should not miss:

Gateway Of India

Enter the city through the Gateway

The Gateway of India stands at the Apollo Bunder waterfront. It looks over the majestic Arabian sea. The arch is built in traditional Indo Islamic style mixed with Roman influence. The structure was built in 1911, to honor the visit of George V. Visitors can enjoy jetty rides near the gateway. The Colaba market is a ten minutes walk away.

Marine Drive

Walk along Mumbai’s beautiful Marine Drive

Any trip to Mumbai is not complete without the Marine Drive. The 3.6 kms long road provides an unparalleled view of the ocean. The street across the drive is filled with art deco buildings. Many of them are heritage sites. The drive has many stalls with Mumbai’s famous street food. Tourists can enjoy the sunset across the boulevard while binging on local delicacies.

Bandra Worli Sea Link

High in the sky, explore the Sea Link

The Sea Link is an iconic Mumbai attraction. It is a cable-stayed bridge that opened in 2009. The bridge offers not only traffic relief but a beautiful view of Mumbai’s suburbs. The Bandra Fort, built-in 1640, is a Portuguese structure that provides stunning views of the Sea Link.

Taj Mahal Palace

The Taj Mahal Palace is an imposing structure in Mumbai.

It’s one of the city’s most famous locations. The facade of the hotel is more than 100 years old. It has been built in Renaissance architectural design, with Islamic influence.  The edifice is one of the most picturesque locations in Mumbai. It is flocked by tourists looking for an idiosyncratic Mumbai picture.

Shree Sidhhivinayak Temple

An Evening of spirituality

The Sidhhivinayak is synonymous with Mumbai. It forms a pivotal part of the Ganesh Chaturthi festival every year. A visit to the Sidhhivinayak gives you a cultural insight into Indian life. It is also ideal for a relaxing spiritual getaway.

Elephanta Islands

Welcome to a UNESCO world heritage site

The Elephanta Island lies in the Mumbai harbor. It is one of the city’s most sought-after location. The caves are a UNESCO world heritage site. The site honors Hindu deity, Shiva. It is a 1600-year-old formation. The structure is built in a Mandala pattern.

The attraction is full of delicate carvings. An imposing six feet statue graces the compounds.

Kala Ghoda Art Precinct

Where art lives and breathes

The Kala Ghoda literally means Black Horse. The name is a reference to the statue of a black horse that once dominated this location. The Kala Ghoda Art Precinct is Mumbai’s cultural hub. It’s a crescent-shaped area. The locale is brimming with the city’s best museums and amazing art galleries.

Every February, the association of the locale holds a Kala Ghoda Art Festival. It is definitely worth a visit for lovers of art and culture.

Haji Ali Dargah

Wade into the Arabian Sea

The Haji Ali was built by Pir Haji Ali Bukhari. He was an infamous Sufi Saint. The structure is both a tomb and a mosque. It was constructed after the saint’s visit to Mecca. The mosque can only be accessed by a walkway that goes into the sea. It is only accessible during the low tide.

Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus

A souvenir from the British Raj

The Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus is one of Mumbai’s main buildings. The image of the building is synonymous with the city. The edifice is a historical terminal train station. It is also a UNESCO world heritage site. The building is built in the Indo Saracenic style. It is a treat for tourists from all over the world. The station was opened in the late nineteenth century. It is still operational and important to Mumbai’s population.

Post Author: Asmi Sharma

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